Slow-fashion, post-pandemic fashion is rediscovered slow and sustainable

Slow fashion as slow food. Fashion looks to the post-pandemic world by trying to redesign its priorities. No more clothes destined to die within a season but garments that can be worn longer. A path that Saveone has been following for some time.

La Covid-19 pandemic it has changed (and is still changing) our way of thinking and acting. The world of fashion is no exception. Big international brands and stylists are wondering what the future of the fashion industry after the coronavirus. The watchword that seems to bring together ideas and sensitivity is slow fashion, that is "slow fashion", to be opposed to ideology fast fashion, made of garments that age rapidly, within a season. In fact, people want clothes you can wear for longer. Slow fashion, therefore, as a new way of imagining the relationship with style. No more compulsive buying of garments destined to be put only once or to remain for months in the closet, but thoughtful choice of clothes that last over time. A diktat that translates into higher quality of the product and in adopting consumer habits more sustainable also for society and the environment.

Saveone focuses on garments destined to last over time 

For Saveone, however, the focus on “slow fashion” is nothing new, a last-minute remedy to respond to new needs emerging from the Coronavirus. In fact, our collections combine novelties and evergreen garments, intended to remain wearable for a very long time. This is the case, for example, of the Italian trousers, present in the store for some time, even if revisited with the 2.0 version. The same goes for the oversized T-shirts, loved by street style enthusiasts, who always maintain the same cut while varying in the patterns proposed. Probably, however, the slowest piece by Saveone is le shoes made in Italy, a jewel of Italian craftsmanship with unassailable quality and timeless taste. New models are added every year, but the previous ones are always available.

Slow fashion in the future of big brands 

The advent of Covid-19, therefore, seems to have only accelerated a trend already underway in the world of international fashion. The so-called also testifies to this Fashion Pact, presented during the G7 summit in Biarritz in August 2019, so before the start of the pandemic. This is a document signed by over 200 operators in the fashion sector, including major brands and suppliers, announcing the guidelines for the new course of global fashion. The commitments enunciated insist above all on the themes of ecology and sustainability. The glittering world of fashion, therefore, seems determined to rethink itself in a radical way, to meet the challenges of the future and play its part in building a new world.